Alternate ways of moving stagnant qi

Therefore, as effective and, in fact, necessary physical exercise is for moving our qi, so too can we exercise our emotions/mind.  Qi stagnation closes things down, tightens things up, and slows things down.  In the mind, qi stagnation manifests as stress/anxiety, irritability or anger, overthinking, excessive worry, depression, an inability to let things go, to name a few.  We can see in these examples that the ‘stuckness’ of the flow of qi through ourselves impacts the way we perceive and interact with the world. 

Thing I Have Learned from Being an Acupuncturist*

*Things I have learned from being an acupuncturist, above and beyond the 3000 years of theory, the requisite biomedicine and microbiology courses, the location and function of the acupuncture points, current acupuncture research, the names and functions of hundreds of herbs, various acupuncture techniques, how to write an herbal formula, anatomy and physiology, etc. In short, what I’ve learned beyond what they teach you in becoming an acupuncturist.

10 Health Tips

I recently got asked the following question: “What health tips would you recommend to all your patients, in general? I know acupuncture is very individualized, but what kinds of things should everyone be doing, regardless of their condition?” So, as we enter into the New Year, over the next 10 days, I’ll offer you my top 10 health tips for everyone…a place to start your journey to a healthier, happier you.

Why I am an acupuncturist

For most of my life up until that point, the relationship with my body was one of seeing how far I could push it. I was an avid long distance runner, used to speed workouts on the track at 6:00 am and long runs at a pace that I couldn’t really keep up. I was used to staying up really late to write papers and hang out with friends. The physical limits of my body were something to be pushed through – not something to learn from and listen to, from which to hear a story of my being. Acupuncture changed that for me.